Category: Louisiana

CB&Q Eng 9908 ‘The Silver Charger&rs…

CB&Q Eng 9908 ‘The Silver Charger’ on No 43

Louisiana, MO
June 4, 1957

CB&Q Engine 9908 Silver Charger on train 4…

CB&Q Engine 9908 Silver Charger on train 43
Louisiana, MO

June 4, 1957

Amtrak’s 40th Anniversary exhibit trai…

Amtrak’s 40th Anniversary exhibit train crosses Lake Pontchartrain on its deadhead from New Orleans to Meridian for display.

February 03, 2012

Southern Railway train No. 41, the southboun…

Southern Railway train No. 41, the southbound PELICAN, was about five miles from its destination at New Orleans Union Passenger Terminal. No. 41 was at milepost 4 on the railroad’s New Orleans Terminal Co. subsidiary near East City Junction. It had a typical consist which reflected the nature of the train: F3A 6704, an F7A, five mail and express cars, the MERIDIAN & NEW ORLEANS Railway Post Office, and two coaches. The mail was removed from the train in late 1967 and it was discontinued in June 1968.

11/15/64

Louisville & Nashville 4-6-2 280 was awa…

Louisville & Nashville 4-6-2 280 was awaiting the departure of train No. 34 – the combined Piedmont Limited-Gulf Wind – from Canal Street Station in New Orleans at 5:00 PM. The Piedmont Limited was bound for New York City via the L&N, West Point Route, Southern Railway, and the Pennsylvania; but between New Orleans and Flomaton, Alabama it included cars for Jacksonville via the Gulf Wind. Today’s train was unusual because it had a combine ahead of its baggage car, probably a dead-head move. The 280 was a USRA design light 4-6-2 and was one a dozen K-5’s (272-283) built by Alco-Brooks in 1924. It was one of the last Pacifics built for the L&N and one of the last to be retired, on 23 April 1954.

3/15/1951

Louisville & Nashville train No. 34, the…

Louisville & Nashville train No. 34, the combined Piedmont for New York and Gulf Wind for Jacksonville, had just gone through the curve from the Mississippi riverfront onto the median of Elysian Fields Avenue and was crossing Decatur Street. The Gulf Wind operated over the Seaboard Air Line west of Chattahochee, Florida and the third car is a Seaboard coach. No. 34 train was being pulled by K-5 class 4-6-2 269. It was one of 26 K-5 class USRA light Pacifics, and one of eight (264-271) built by Baldwin in 1923. It was retired on 7 July 1953.

2/15/1950

Louisville & Nashville K-5 class 4-6-2 2…

Louisville & Nashville K-5 class 4-6-2 265 was leading train No. 34 – the combined Piedmont Limited-Gulf Wind – out of Canal Street Station in New Orleans. The Piedmont Limited was bound for New York City via the L&N, West Point Route, Southern Railway, and the Pennsylvania; but between New Orleans and Flomaton, Alabama it included cars for the Gulf Wind. This latter train operated between Flomaton and Chattahochee, Florida as L&N No. 61 and on into Jacksonville as Seaboard Air Line No. 38. The train’s third car was a Seaboard coach.
No. 34 left New Orleans at 5:00 P.M. and arrived in New York’s Pennsylvania Station – 1,357 miles away – at 6:25 on the second morning out, while the Gulf Wind arrived in Jacksonville – 612 miles – at 9:00 on the first morning. The curved track on the extreme right belonged to the New Orleans Public Belt, the next two tracks were owned by the Southern Pacific, and the track next to No. 34 was the L&N’s southbound main line. The 265 was built by Baldwin in 1923 and retired on 1 February 1954.

2/15/1950

SR’s Southerner

SR’s Southerner

New Orleans–Washington Southerner crossing Lake Pontchartrain east of New Orleans, c. 1940.

Pan-American/Gulf Wind

Pan-American/Gulf Wind

Combined New Orleans–Cincinnati Pan-American and New Orleans–Jacksonville, Fla., Gulf Wind at New Orleans, Apr. 27, 1971.

Illinois Central Observation on Train 5, the…

Illinois Central  Observation on Train 5, the Panama Limited - Magnolia Star at New Orleans, LA, Uniuon Terminal on November 22, 1967

Illinois Central Observation on Train 5, the Panama Limited – Magnolia Star at New Orleans, LA, Union Terminal on November 22, 1967 by Marty Bernard

Via Flickr:

A Roger Puta Photograph